Thursday, 20 December 2018

How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing

  Samim Hossain       Thursday, 20 December 2018

How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing 

How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing
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How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing Most examiners make tremendous allowances for work done under pressure and don’t expect a perfect performance, but a student who can turn in a measured, controlled piece of writing always impresses in examinations. The same applies, curiously, to word-processed essays. These are usually very professional in appearance, but what matters is the weight of the argument and how that is executed from beginning to end.
But let’s look at how the advice applies in other areas. If you were studying politics, or taking a general studies paper, you might have to write an essay about the victory of the Labor Party in the 1997 General Election, and the humiliation of the Conservative Party in that election. In an unplanned essay, you might start by saying that Labor had been out of office for 18 years, then wander on to the part that Tony Blair played, perhaps touching on the divisions within the Conservative Party. But it would be a loose collection of Ideas in which you were looking for a shape and direction. It seems to make a lot more sense to establish some opening propositions, then to see what happened next, and finally to consider what this led to. After an opening paragraph outlining the bare facts, therefore, you might start with the position before the election (Tony Blair reforming the Labor Party, and divisions over Europe in the Conservative Party), then go on to the actual campaign how the campaign went for both main parties), and then the result (where you might try to analyze the significance that can be read into the result).
The point is that within such a three-step sequence you have total control of the argument and the material you want to include in the argument. We fence saw a television programmed about a broadcaster who had spent his entire life working for the BBC. He had always been very popular and successful, but openly admitted that in every interview he had conducted on television he had only ever asked three questions: ‘How did all this come about?’, ‘What happened next?’, ‘and then?’ The fact is that most academic essays can ultimately be reduced to this simple format, and will almost inevitably work better if they are reduced to this format.
There are, though, a few more tricks involved in essay writing, in particular, how to start and how to finish. In opening an essay the secret is not to fallout the trap of waffling on for too long in the first paragraph. The temptation is to rely on superfluous biographical or historical material rather than engaging with the terms of the question in a direct way that establishes the essay and the problem being discussed. In other words, use the beginning positively. Look at this opening paragraph of an essay on the novelist William Thackeray. The question title was ‘Thackeray will always be seen as less radical than Dickens’:
Thackeray was at one time seen as the equal of, even superior to, his contemporary Charles Dickens. Even in his lifetime, however, there were reservations, a sense that Thackeray was old-fashioned. Yet it is possibly the ‘old-fashioned’ qualities of Thackeray that make him interesting, for this is an awkward voice resisting the new assumptions at the heart of much mid-Victorian writing?
Can you see how the issue is set up, but does not outstay its welcome? The paragraph anticipates, but it does no more than raise expectations. We are prepared for an essay that will in the first section give us a sense of the nature of Thackeray’s works, then go on in the next section to explain the ways in which they might be considered old-fashioned, before finally, in the third section, trying to define the unusual power that the writer of the essay sees as resulting from Thackeray’s old-fashioned approach.
It is easy to underestimate this kind of opening. Some people prefer to start with a resume of the essay, saying exactly what the argument is going to be and spelling out the conclusions. That is fine: it tells the reader what to Expect and what to look out for, as in a report or technical document. The opening above also tells the reader what to expect and what conclusions might emerge by outlining the three topics that will form the substance of the essay and the problem being discussed. But it also manages to suggest that the final conclusions the essay will draw may be more complicated than we might expect and not lend them to simple summary. The opening, that is, leaves room for the essay to develop and also to arrive somewhere rather than being all over in the first paragraph.

How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing

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How to Apply Examples In Essay Writing
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